AACE Executive Council

(September 2017 – October 2018)

AACE is governed by an Executive Council that includes:

 

Officers

(ending year of term noted in parentheses)

   
President: Kathleen Heneghan, MSN, RN

Kathleen Cullen Heneghan, is the Assistant Director of the Division of Education, Surgical Patient Education Program (SPEP) at the American College of Surgeons (ACS). Ms. Heneghan is responsible for the national assessment and development of patient education programs in surgery. She collaborates with surgical specialty and professional organizations to develop, implement and evaluate the surgical patient education resources including electronic, print and simulation. The Surgical Patient Education Program aims to support professionals with evidenced based education programs and empower patients with the skills and knowledge needed for full participation in care.
Download Kathleen's complete biosketch.

Disclosure Statement:
No relevant financial relationships to disclose

   
President-Elect: Charles Moore, MD, PhD

Dr. Moore is an Associate Professor of Otolaryngology - Head & Neck Surgery and Co-Director of the Center for Cranial Base Surgery at the Emory University School of Medicine. He is also the Chief of Service Otolaryngology - Head & Neck Surgery at Grady Memorial Hospital. The focus of his research is on the investigation of factors involved in disparity of healthcare, with a particular focus on head and neck cancer incidence in medically underserved communities, including a special interest in health equality. Dr. Moore contributes to the research of craniomaxillofacial trauma and anterior cranial base tumor pathology. Dr. Moore has numerous Honors, Awards, and Professional Memberships.

Read about Charles Moore, MD, PhD

Disclosure Statement:
No relevant financial relationships to disclose

   
Vice President: Ewa Szumacher, MD, MEd, FCRP(C)

Dr. Ewa Szumacher is Associate Professor in the Department of Radiation Oncology University of Toronto, Canada. She is affiliate scientist in Evaluative Clinical Sciences, Odette Cancer Research Program, Sunnybrook Research Institute. She is an academic coordinator in Medical Radiation Sciences Program, Department of Radiation Oncology UofT. Her research focus is to understand patient preferences for radiotherapy treatments across different treatment sites (palliative radiotherapy, breast ca and GU malignancies). Dr. Szumacher aims to improve the care of cancer patients by working together as an interprofessional team in radiation oncology practice. This is achieved by: fostering an interprofessional practice in radiation oncology through continuing medical education (CME), scholarly work and research, developing an interprofessional learning environment and creating modalities for continuing professional education in radiation therapy by organizing interprofessional CME events, investigating interprofessional needs of cancer care providers and trainees.

Publications list (via PubMed)

University of Toronto profile (department of radiation oncology)

Disclosure Statement:
No relevant financial relationships to disclose

   
Secretary: Natasha Riley, MURP (2018)

Natasha Riley earned her Masters of Urban and Regional Planning (MURP) from the University of New Orleans in New Orleans, LA.  During her career in urban planning, she developed and implemented public policies, procedures and programs.  She worked in the field of urban planning until her sister’s tragic death from breast cancer made her realize that she could be making a greater contribution to improving community well-being by transitioning into the field of health education and promotion.  Ever since that insightful moment 15 years ago, Natasha Riley has been developing and implementing breast cancer education and support service programs.  Her research interest includes reducing health disparities, with a strong focus on lowering the morbidity and mortality rates among African-American women.  Toward that goal, she has developed and implemented community-academic partnerships to gain more support and funding for her health promoting agendas.  Natasha Riley was the Community Principal Investigator for a community-campus research collaborative, where she assisted in the development, analysis, and implementation of a breast cancer clinical trials education program designed to increase African-American and Latina women’s understanding of cancer research trials with the goal of increasing African American and Hispanic American women’s participation in clinical trials.  

Natasha Riley has received numerous awards and honors underscoring her contribution to improving community health, including North County Times (San Diego) “Women of Merit”; California Breast Cancer Research Program’s “Faith Fancher Research” Award, and the San Diego Business Journal’s “Health Care Champion – Health Care Educator" Award.

Disclosure Statement:
No relevant financial relationships to disclose

   
Treasurer: Eric Vinson (2018)

Eric Vinson is the Program Coordinator at the Northwest Tribal Comprehensive Cancer Program. An enrolled Cherokee Nation member, Mr. Vinson focuses on cancer issues in Northwest American Indian and Alaska Native (AI/AN) communities. His work has concentrated on financial and educational resources available to cancer patients and caregivers; educational interventions to address the issues of cancer in Northwest American Indian and Alaska Native communities; and health care provider trainings to increase capacity of Indian Health Service clinicians. He coordinates NTCCP's Tribal Cancer Minigrants, supporting Northwest Tribes to reach community members through innovative educational venues such as a cancer education program provided for men at a tribal golf event. Mr. Vinson's current work focuses on AI/AN survivorship and includes projects on patient documentation and primary care clinical systems use of cancer treatment summaries and survivorship plans. He is the recipient of: research awards from the US Navy and Army; and Harvey Mudd College Chemistry Department Award for Extraordinary Service to its Students and Faculty.

Disclosure Statement:
No relevant financial relationships to disclose

   

Members at Large

(ending year of term noted in parentheses)

   
Kathleen Blazer, EdD, MS (2020)
  Bio and picture coming soon.

Disclosure Statement:
No relevant financial relationships to disclose

 
Katie Cueva, ScD, MAT, MPH (2018)

Dr. Cueva is an Assistant Professor of Public Policy and Health at the Institute of Social and Economic Research at the University of Alaska Anchorage. She is also a CDC/CSTE Applied Epidemiology Fellow working with the Alaska Division of Public Health, and Associate Faculty with the Center for American Indian Health at the Johns Hopkins Bloomberg School of Public Health. Her research interests include social determinants of health in the circumpolar north, culturally appropriate health promotion and healthcare delivery, community based participatory action research, and health equity. Dr. Cueva is a co-investigator on a National Cancer Institute award with the Alaska Native Tribal Health Consortium to develop, implement, and evaluate culturally relevant online cancer education with Alaska's community health aides/practitioners. She currently serves on the executive council of the American Indian, Alaska Native and Native Hawaiian caucus of the American Public Health Association. Her numerous awards include the R. Davilene Carter Presidential Prize for best submitted manuscript, the Selma Morris Memorial Travel Scholarship for "exceptionally promising work in global cancer education," and the Dr. Fang Ching Sun Memorial Award "for a demonstrated commitment to promoting the health of vulnerable people."

Disclosure Statement:
No relevant financial relationships to disclose

 
Clement Gwede, PhD, MPH, RN, FAAN (2019)

Dr. Clement Gwede is Associate Member in the Department of Health Outcomes and Behavior, Division of Population Sciences at the Moffitt Cancer Center & Research Institute, and Associate Professor in the Department of Oncologic Sciences, College of Medicine at the University of South Florida in Tampa FL. He has served as Faculty Associate Director for Diversity at Moffitt Cancer Center since 2005, with emphasis on patient diversity initiatives and minority participation in clinical research.  Leveraging his training in public health and nursing, his research focuses on reducing cancer health disparities. Supported by grants from the National Institutes of Health (NIH)/National Cancer Institute (NCI), American Cancer Society (ACS), Centers for Disease Control & Prevention (CDC) and the State of Florida Biomedical Research Branch, his current research addresses health equity through culturally appropriate interventions to improve colon cancer screening rates among medically underserved individuals from diverse racial/ethnic and cultural backgrounds. These research studies are heavily vested in cancer education principles, community engagement and use principles of community-based participatory research (CBPR) methods.  

Dr. Gwede is co-director of the Tampa Bay Community Cancer Network (TBCCN), an NCI-funded Community Networks Program Center (CNPC) leveraging community-academic partnerships to address cancer health disparities through research, training and education; and mentoring students and junior investigators in CBPR methodologies. Dr. Gwede has served on several national committees and peer-review study sections and has published over 90 scientific articles in health promotion, cancer education and cancer prevention and control. 

Additional information (Moffitt website)

Disclosure Statement:
No relevant financial relationships to disclose

   
Jill Hamilton PhD, RN (2018)

Jill Hamilton, R.N., Ph.D. FAAN is Acting Associate Professor at the Nell Hodgson Woodruff School of Nursing at Emory University in Atlanta, Georgia. Dr. Hamilton earned her BSN, MSN, and PhD in nursing from the University of North Carolina at Chapel Hill, a BS in Accounting from North Carolina Central University, and postdoctoral training in the nursing care of older adults at the Oregon Health & Science University. She previously held faculty positions at Johns Hopkins University and the University of North Carolina at Chapel Hill where she was tenured Associate Professor. Dr. Hamilton’s research interests include health disparities, social and cultural factors that influence health, and the coping strategies used among older African American cancer survivors and their families. She has developed measures of coping and spirituality and has conducted research to examine ways sociocultural factors influence how older African Americans use social support and spirituality. Dr. Hamilton is published on topics related to social support, religiosity, spirituality, and quality of life among African Americans with life-threatening illness. She has done original research on the effects of religious songs and verses from Scripture on coping with stress among older and younger African Americans which is published in the Journal of Religion and Health, the Gerontologist, and Nursing Research. Her research on the use of religious songs to alleviate psychological distress when diagnosed with cancer is published in Cancer Nursing. She was a Georgia Cancer Coalition Distinguished Cancer Scholar from 2003-2007 and a member of the 2014 Class of the UNC Thorp Faculty Engaged Scholars. Dr. Hamilton is currently a Fellow in the American Academy of Nursing and a Faculty Scholar of the Center for Spirituality, Theology & Health at Duke University. She was the recipient of the 2011 Oncology Nursing Society (ONS) Publishing’s Division Award for Excellence in Writing Qualitative Research and her work on religious songs was featured in the November 2012 Thanksgiving edition of Good Housekeeping magazine.

Disclosure Statement:
No relevant financial relationships to disclose

   
Maria Jibaja-Weiss, MEd, EdD (2017)

Maria Jibaja-Weiss directs the Office of Outreach and Health Disparities (OOHD) of the Dan L. Duncan Cancer Center, Baylor College of Medicine. For over 20 years, she has led the development and evaluation of award-winning cancer educational materials in a variety of formats, focusing on making design and media considerations for culturally diverse and lower literate populations. Most of her research and implementation studies have been targeted at educating minority underserved populations, in particular Spanish- and English-speaking Latino individuals, on varied health topics such as breast, cervical, and colorectal cancer screening, breast cancer risk reduction, and making healthy lifestyle choices for chronic disease prevention (i.e., diabetes mellitus type 2, cancer). As director of the OOHD, she oversees community education, screening and prevention services for the underserved in the office's Catchment Area, as well as dissemination of important new discoveries to the public. As PI of a grant from the Cancer Prevention and Research Institute of Texas (CPRIT) in 2010, she established the Community Network for Cancer Prevention (CNCP) which initially focused on reducing colorectal and cervical cancer mortality in a largely Hispanic and black population served in the office's catchment area of Harris County.  With a recent grant from CPRIT, the CNCP's activities are being expanded to include breast cancer prevention strategies with the goal of promoting cancer awareness, and improve screening and mortality in the office's Catchment Area.

Disclosure Statement:
No relevant financial relationships to disclose

   
Michael Ortiz, MD (2019)

Dr. Michael Ortiz is a fellow in pediatric hematology and oncology at Memorial Sloan Kettering Cancer Center and New York Presbyterian Weill Cornell Medical Center in New York City. Dr. Ortiz developed an interest in education during his pediatric residency at Children’s National Medical Center in Washington, DC. He has since received several awards for teaching and education, most notably the 2013 Ray E. Helfer Award for Innovation in Medical Education. As a member of the lab of Dr. Alex Kentsis, Dr. Ortiz’s current research leverages proteogenomics to rationally target therapy resistance in refractory embryonal sarcomas.

AACE eNews Profile

Disclosure Statement:
No relevant financial relationships to disclose
   
Vanessa Sheppard, PhD (2020)

Dr. Sheppard is Professor and Chair of the Department of Health Behavior and Policy in the School of Medicine at Virginia Commonwealth University. She also serves as Associate Director for Disparities Research in the Massey Cancer Center and co-leads the Cancer Prevention and Control Program. Prior to joining VCU, Dr. Sheppard was tenured at Georgetown University in Washington, DC, where she led studies focused on reducing inequities among cancer survivors through scholarship, teaching and service. Her team has been among the first to develop decision and communication support tools about systemic therapy for newly diagnosed African American, African-born, and Latino women. She has received funding from the National Institutes of Health, the American Cancer Society and other entities focused on adherence to adjuvant hormonal therapy, improving physical activity in African American survivors, and examining patient-reported factors that influence receipt of recommended systemic therapies. Her long-term goal is to identify modifiable factors that have potential to promote optimal survival for women with breast cancer.

Disclosure Statement:
No relevant financial relationships to disclose

   
   

Chair, Advisory Committee (Immediate Past President)

Maria C. Bishop, MD, BSN

Dr. Bishop is Professor of Medicine, in the Department of Medicine, at the University of Arizona, and a member of The University of Arizona Cancer Center in Tucson. She is a medical oncologist, Program Director of the Section of Hematology/Oncology, and Chair of the Ethics Committee at the Southern Arizona Veterans Administration Health Care System. She specializes in neuro-oncology and end-of-life care. Her research interests are developing and evaluating cancer related curricula for predoctoral and postdoctoral students and international cancer education. Dr. Bishop is also an Associate Editor of the Journal of Cancer Education.

Dr. Bishop was included on the Dean's List for Excellence in Teaching in the Clinical Sciences and is a Faculty Mentor for the Societies Program at The University of Arizona College of Medicine. Societies, a professional learning community, is a four-year longitudinal teaching and mentoring program for medical students where they learn interviewing, physical examination, and patient care skills at the patient bedside. Dr. Bishop is board-certified in internal medicine, medical oncology, and hospice and palliative medicine.

Read about Dr. Bishop, MD, BSN, FACP

Disclosure Statement:
No relevant financial relationships to disclose

   

EACE President

Charles G Kelly, FRCP, FRCR

Charles G Kelly is a Consultant Clinical Oncologist and Head of Radiotherapy at the Northern Centre for Cancer Care, Freeman Hospital, Newcastle upon Tyne , UK and an Honorary Senior Lecturer In Newcastle University. He is the former degree programme director and now deputy DPD for Newcastle University online Masters in Oncology and Palliative Care and this year has become the President of EACE. His clinical interests include Head and Neck and Thyroid Cancer, Skin cancer and Melanoma.

Disclosure Statement:
No relevant financial relationships to disclose

   

Ex-Officio Member

Ming Lei, PhD, National Cancer Institute, Bethesda, MD

Ming Lei PhD is the Deputy Director of the National Cancer Institute (NCI)'s Center for Cancer Training and the Chief of the Cancer Training Branch of the Center for Cancer Training. He oversees NCI's Fellowships, Career Development Awards and Institutional Training & Education grant programs. He is a member of the Science Education Committee of the American Association for Cancer Research (AACR).

Dr. Lei is a molecular geneticist by training. He earned his PhD degree from Cornell University and stayed there for postdoctoral training. He was a faculty member at the Medical College of Wisconsin, where he taught Genetics and Microbiology to medical students and graduate students. He was a NIH-funded principal investigator focusing his research efforts on the regulation of eukaryotic DNA replication. He began his governmental service in 2006 at the National Science Foundation, where he managed NSF's research grant portfolio in Molecular Biology, Genetics and Genomics. He has been with the National Cancer Institute since 2008.

Disclosure Statement:
No relevant financial relationships to disclose